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Roman children"s sarcophagi their decoration and its social significance by Janet Huskinson

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Published by Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Italy,
  • Ostia (Extinct city),
  • Rome,
  • Rome.

Subjects:

  • Sarcophagi, Roman -- Themes, motives.,
  • Sarcophagi, Roman -- Italy -- Ostia (Extinct city),
  • Sarcophagi, Early Christian -- Rome -- Themes, motives.,
  • Sarcophagi, Early Christian -- Italy -- Ostia (Extinct city) -- Themes, motives.,
  • Children -- Tombs -- Rome.,
  • Children -- Tombs -- Italy -- Ostia (Extinct city)

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [126]-130) and indexes.

StatementJanet Huskinson.
SeriesOxford monographs on classical archaeology
Classifications
LC ClassificationsNB1810 .H87 1996
The Physical Object
Pagination135 p., [16] p. of plates :
Number of Pages135
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL804791M
ISBN 10019814086X
LC Control Number95041325

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  Roman Children's Sarcophagi by Janet Huskinson, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(1). Roman children's sarcophagi by Janet Huskinson, , Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press edition, in EnglishCited by: Get this from a library! Roman children's sarcophagi: their decoration and its social significance. [Janet Huskinson] -- This book is the first major study of the themes which were used in the decoration of sarcophagi made for children in Rome and Ostia from the late first to early fourth century AD. It .   Roman children's sarcophagi by Janet Huskinson, unknown edition, Edition Notes Includes bibliographical references (p. []) and :

The chapter opens by defining ‘Roman’ and ‘children’ (in Roman sarcophagus terms) and problems inherent in both. The discussion starts with a brief description and outline of Roman burial practices involving sarcophagus burials, including how the city of Rome may have differed from e.g. northern Italy in terms of children and : Janet Huskinson. This book is the first major study of the themes which were used in the decoration of sarcophagi made for children in Rome and Ostia from the late first to early fourth century AD. It provides a selective catalogue of examples of each type, followed by discussion of how these fit into the general pattern.   Books Advanced Search New Releases Best Sellers & More Children's Books Textbooks Textbook Rentals Best Books of the Month Books › my work is outsider scholarship—yet here is documentation of 1, presently existing Roman Empire sarcophagi. In the burial practices of ancient Rome and Roman funerary art, marble and limestone sarcophagi elaborately carved in relief were characteristic of elite inhumation burials from the 2nd to the 4th centuries AD. At le Roman sarcophagi have survived, with fragments possibly representing as many as 20, Although mythological scenes have been quite widely studied, sarcophagus relief.

This volumepresents acollection of essays on different aspects of Roman sarcophagi. These varied approaches will produce fresh insights into a subject which is receiving increased interest in English-language scholarship, with a new awareness of the important contribution that sarcophagi can make to the study of the social use and production of Roman art. The sarcophagi served as an interior embellishment of a new, distinctively private form of sepulchral monument, in which commemorative practice abandoned its former public proclamations in favor of a more limited audience. The sarcophagus brought with it as well a decisive transformation of the conventions long established for funerary imagery. Aphrodisias preserves an extensive body of sarcophagi from a single urban community of the Roman period. There are some pieces: whole sarcophagi, lids, and fragments. The earliest are of the first century BC, the latest of the fourth century AD, and many were re-used for new burials in late antiquity. Roman Sarcophagi in the Metropolitan Museum of Art Anna Marguerite McCann, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.) Metropolitan Museum of Art, - Art - pages.